The Leadership Pipeline Seminar

After all this talk about church and vision over the past few months, it’s time to make this practical.

  • What are the next logical steps to develop this equipping model of ministry?
  • How is the church designed to free members to find and fulfill what God has called them to do?
  • What are the next steps in personal spiritual development?
  • What is difference between a map and a menu?
  • What is the difference between a destination and a direction?
  • What is the difference between training volunteers and training leaders?
  • How would you describe our current leadership pathway?
  • How can we get this vision from a pipe dream to a pipeline?
  • Who will succeed you in your ministry after you are gone?

Beginning on Wednesday, October 25, we will have a 7-session video and discussion series on what is called “Leadership Pipeline.” Why? Because of this new vision Ken has been casting, and what we are calling “the next” for King’s Grant (development of an equipping culture), it cannot not happen apart from leadership development.

These video sessions are from the 2016 leadership pipeline conference and will cover these topics…

  1. Conviction, Culture, Constructs (Eric Geiger)
  2. A Vision for Pipeline and Your Vision’s Pipeline (Will Mancini)
  3. Strategy (Kevin Peck)
  4. Collaboration (Jenni Catron)
  5. Who Moved My Pulpit? And Other Change Issues (Thom Rainer)
  6. Leading Leaders (Carey Nieuwhof)
  7. Discipleship (Paul Tripp)

It all starts this Wednesdays October 25 in the sanctuary at 6:15.

Lasting Impact “I Will” Video Challenge

These video segments are coordinated with Ken’s teaching series called, How to Make a Lasting Impact (October – November 2017).

We handed out the Thom Rainer book to every family, and I challenge classes to get together and discuss the information we learn from our reading. We are not replacing the class lessons, but hope that we can stimulate conversation by encouraging every family to read this book.

  1. I Will – an Introduction – October 1
  2. I Will Gather for Worship – October 8
  3. I Will Gather in a Small Group – October 15

For the rest of the series, check out kgbc.us/impact.

10 Reasons to Join a Group

King’s Grant Baptist is about building the Kingdom through making disciples, which means helping you to become a devoted follower of Jesus. Small groups are the key in your spiritual growth process. Below you will find some positive benefits in becoming involved in a small group; yep, you get something out of being in a small group.

1. You will begin to really feel like part of God’s family.

We believe it is imperative that as a church grows larger, it should also grow smaller at the same time. It should be the desire of growing churches to provide a small group for everyone that wants to get connected. In a society that is increasingly mobile and where families are fragmented, small groups can provide a family atmosphere where no one has to stand alone.

2. You will grow spiritually faster in a group than alone.

We have been “predestined to become conformed to the image of Christ” (Romans 8:29). Spiritual growth involves life change. Life change is optimized in the context of a small group. 2 Timothy 2:22 teaches that we are to “run after” godly character and “run away” from the passions of youth. This verse instructs us not to do this alone but “with those who call upon the Lord from a pure heart.” God wants us to stop “trying” and start “training”. It’s always easier to exercise physically or spiritually in a group than alone (1 Timothy 4:7b).

3. You will receive customized care.

Each member of a small group provides care for the other members of the group (1 Corinthians 12:25). The group leader oversees the pastoral care of the group through the sub-group leaders. The group, rather than church staff, becomes the first line of resources. This is accomplished as believers in the group see themselves as contributors and not just consumers, givers and not just attenders.

4. You will not have to go through struggles alone.

It’s not only possible but also probable that you could walk into and out of a large group event with hurts, heartaches, and soul-searching questions but never connect with someone that will show an interest in you or identify with your difficulty. In a small group setting the principle of “commonality” is often experienced. Many of us think our struggles are unique to us, but in a small group we find out that personal problems are universal. It’s exciting to find out that the members of your group have not only struggled with common problems but have found common solutions in God’s Word (1 Corinthians 10:13).

5. You will have a natural way to share Christ with friends, relatives, and work associates.

It may be that some of your friends who don’t know the Lord wouldn’t be caught dead in a church. They have a preconceived idea and just the thought makes them defensive. But those same people may be open to an invitation to a casual Bible discussion in a home or office setting. In a small group, your unbelieving friend can ask questions and express honest doubts without feeling “put on the spot”. When your friend sees the love and warmth and honesty of your group, it will make him more receptive to the good news (John 13:35; Acts 5:42).

6. You will be a New Testament Christian.

The early church met as a large group for corporate worship at the temple and then as small groups from house to house (Acts 2:46; 5:42; 20:20; Romans 16:5; 1 Corinthians 16:19; Colossians 4:15; Philemon 1:2). The New Testament is very clear about how God intended for His people to meet in small groups so they could experience authentic biblical community. The New Testament is also very clear to point out that these were communities with a purpose. They used these small groups to fulfill the Great Commission in a Great Commandment way. They weren’t an end in themselves.

7. You will have a place to discover and use your spiritual gifts.

When people are born into their physical family they are given natural talents, but when they are born into the family of God they are given spiritual gifts. These gifts are God-given abilities that enable believers to effectively serve one another. Attending a spiritual gift workshop and taking a gift assessment is a vital step in discovering your gift mix, but it is the members of your group that provide confirmation of your gift after watching you in action. People that have no arena in which to exercise their gifts struggle to identify them. A neighborhood group is a wonderful place to steward the gifts God has sovereignly given you (1 Peter 4:10, 11).

8. Prayer will become more meaningful to you.

Many people are hesitant to pray in front of others, especially in a large church. In a small group of 6-12, you will learn to participate in prayer by having a conversation together with God. No one is pressured to pray, but as you become comfortable, you’ll be able to pray sentence prayers and join in. There are many promises in the Bible related to group prayer. In praying together with a few others, we are drawn together and we find answers to the needs in our lives (Matthew 18:19).

9. You will develop leadership skills.

Many people are scared of the word “leadership”. John Maxwell says, “Leadership is just influence.” Most believers would say without reservation that they want to influence their world for Christ. They would love to be used by God to lead someone to Christ and see him grow up spiritually and multiply himself. Acts 4:13 says “Now as they observed the confidence of Peter and John and understood that they were uneducated and untrained men, they were amazed, and began to recognize them as having been with Jesus.” These men had obtained the confidence they needed to lead others to the Savior because they had been discipled in Jesus’ group. Discipleship ultimately produces leadership skills in you. One day you will be discipling a small group of believers.

10. You will understand the Bible better in a neighborhood group.

Have you ever listened to a message from the Bible at a worship service and wanted to stop the speaker and say “But what about….?” or “I don’t understand!” If so, then a small group is for you. The message that is taught in our worship service is one way communication. You listen while the speaker speaks. It’s fine for imparting knowledge, but not as effective for personal application as a small group. In a small group setting, you can ask questions, participate in a discussion of the text, and hear others share their insights and illustrations of the truth you are trying to grasp. The Bible must be applied to your own personal situations and that happens best in small groups.

INFORMATION from Rick Leineweber, Virginia Beach Missional Church

8 Purposes of Small Groups

small-group-grow

King’s Grant Baptist is about building the Kingdom through making disciples, which means helping you to become a devoted follower of Jesus. Small groups are the key in this growth process because we are created for community. Below you will find some positive reasons to become involved in a small group.

1. You will build authentic relationships

Most people who have been a part of a small group say the greatest benefit is the close relationships and friendships that develop. You’ll also discover that your needs and feelings are not unique – we’re all in the same boat. It helps to know that others are facing the same difficulties, or have lived through them and learned spiritual principles in the process. The Bible instructs us to pray, love, encourage and accept one another. The best way to do this is in a small group! We really do need each other. God never meant for you to go it alone in life. If you’re lonely, the answer is to join a group. In a small group, you can belong before you believe.

2. The Bible will make more sense in your life

In a small group setting, you can ask questions, participate in discussion of the text, and hear others share insights and illustrations of the truth your group grasps. The Bible must be applied to your own personal situations and that happens best in small groups.

3. You will discover the benefits of prayer

No one is pressured to pray, but as you become comfortable, you will be able to pray sentence prayers and join in. There are many promises in the Bible related to group prayer. In praying with others, we are drawn together and we find answers to the needs in our lives. Prayer draws you into a deeper relationship with God.

4. You will be able to handle stress and pressure better

Small groups provide excellent support in times of crisis, change and stress. You will experience a sense of stability and security knowing there are people who really care and support you when you need it the most.

5. You will have a natural way to share Christ with others

It may be that some of your friends who don’t have an intimate relationship with God would not be caught dead in church. They have a preconceived idea and just the thought makes them defensive. But these same people may be open to an invitation to a casual Bible discussion in a home. In a small group, your friend can ask questions and express honest doubts without feeling “put on the spot.” When your friend sees the love and warmth and honesty of those in your small group, it will make him or her more receptive to the Good News.

6. You will develop leadership skills you never knew you had

The Bible teaches that every believer is given certain talents or “gifts” to benefit others in the family of God. As you share and participate in a relaxed small group setting, you will discover your confidence and self-esteem rising. This will help you at work, at church and in every other relationship.

7. You will deepen your understanding of worship

Worship isn’t something that can only happen on Sunday morning. Worship happens anytime we focus on God. Sometimes that happens best in a smaller group praying or singing together. In fact, all five purposes of the church can be experienced within the small group setting.

8. You will be a New Testament Christian!

The book of Acts is very clear about how God intends for his people to grow and have their needs met in the church. We will never be able to hire enough professional ministerial staff to meet all of the individual needs within our church family. But God never intended for it to work that way! Consider the following verses:

•”They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread, and to prayer. All the believers were together and had everything in common. And they continued to meet together; they broke bread in their homes and ate together; and the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved.” (Acts 2:42, 44, 46-47)

•”Day after day, in the temple courts and from house to house they never stopped teaching and proclaiming the Good News that Jesus is the Christ.” (Acts 5:42)

•”Greet also the church that meets at their house.” (Romans 16:5)

•”Aquilla and Priscilla greet you warmly in the Lord and so does the church that meets in their house.” (2 Corinthians 16:19)

•”Give my greetings to Nympha and the church in her house.” (Colossians 4:15)

So, now what?

Small groups offer the eight benefits shared above that no believer can afford to give up. If you are not participating in a small group, why not join one? If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our pastor of discipleship, Scott Chafee.

* Adapted from “Eight Reasons to Join Small Groups” at www.saddleback.com.

What is a Disciple?

Years ago I was a part of a small group of pastors whose passion is developing community and disciples through small groups. In a previous post I pondered the question, How to Spot a Disciple of Jesus, but I recently found this definition of a disciple describing, What a Disciple of Jesus Looks Like.


The English word “apostle” comes from the Greek term apostolos, which means a messenger, envoy, or ambassador. Related to the verb, “to send,” it refers to one who is “sent” on behalf of another.

The term “apostle” in the New Testament is used primarily to designate that group of leaders within the early church(es) who were historical witnesses of the resurrected Lord and proclaimers of God’s saving mercies enacted through the death and resurrection of Jesus. Jesus originally gave the title to His closest circle of friends, the twelve (Luke 6:13).

The term “disciple” comes to us in English from a Latin root. Its basic meaning is “learner” or “pupil.” The term is virtually absent from the Old Testament, though there are two related references (1 Chronicles 25:8; Isaiah 8:16).

In the Greek world the word “disciple” normally referred to an adherent of a particular teacher or religious/philosophical school. It was the task of the disciple to learn, study, and pass along the sayings and teachings of the master. In rabbinic Judaism the term “disciple” referred to one who was committed to the interpretations of Scripture and religious tradition given him by the master or rabbi. Through a process of learning which would include a set meeting time and such pedagogical methods as question and answer, instruction, repetition, and memorization, the disciple would become increasingly devoted to the master and the master’s teachings. In time, the disciple would, likewise, pass on the traditions to others.

The Gospels clearly show that the word “disciple” can refer to others besides the twelve. The verb “follow” became something of a technical term Jesus used to call His disciples, who were then called “followers,” (Mark 4:10). These “followers” included a larger company of people from whom He selected the twelve (Mark 3:7-19; Luke 6:13-17). This larger group of disciples/followers included men and women (Luke 8:1-3; 23:49) from all walks of life. (Even the twelve included a variety: fishermen, a tax collector, a Zealot.) Jesus was no doubt especially popular among the socially outcast and religiously despised, but people of wealth and of theological training also followed (Luke 8:1-3; 19:1-10; John 3:1-3; 12:42; 19:38-39).

The Book of Acts frequently uses the term “disciple” to refer generally to all those who believe in the risen Lord (6:1-2,7; 9:1,10,19,26,38; 11:26,29). In addition, the verb form “to disciple” as it appears in the final commissioning scene of Matthew’s Gospel (Matthew 28:19-20) also suggests a use in the early church of the term “disciple” as a more generalized name for all those who come to Jesus in faith, having heard and believed the gospel.

We have seen that, as references to the twelve, the words “apostle” and “disciple” could be synonymous. However, just as the term “disciple” could mean other followers of Jesus than the twelve in the time of His ministry, so also after His resurrection the term “disciple” had a wider meaning as well, being clearly applied to all His followers. Whereas the term “apostle” retained a more specific meaning, being tied to certain historical eyewitnesses of the resurrected Lord, the word “disciple” tended to lose its narrower associations with the twelve, and/or those who followed the historical Jesus, or who saw the risen Lord, and became a virtual equivalent to “Christian” (Acts 11:26). In every case, however, the common bond of meaning for the various applications of the word “disciple” was allegiance to Jesus.

This information is an excerpt from the Holman Bible Dictionary.